Review: “Broken Record: A Contemporary Musical” (Stage 773 Theatre)

c700x420Show: Broken Record: A Contemporary Musical

Company: Stage 773 Theatre

Venue:  Stage 773 (1225 W. Belmont Ave.)

Die Roll: 15

A woman must pick up the pieces after her husband commits suicide. Another must care for her emotionally distant mother. A man dealing with the stigma brought on by his disabilities turns to his family. A woman starts over after the breakup of a long-term relationship, and another deals with long standing issues with weight and body image. None of these things may sound like laughing matters, but in ‘Broken Record” each performer invites us to look in on their own personal warts, and come to the same conclusion they did: surmounting this deep emotional pain makes you a champion. A card-carrying, bona fide adult person.

The improvised comedy musical can be a challenging format to use to develop an artistically and emotionally rich production. But, with “Broken Record”, director Jill Valentine and composer Brad Kemp have taken great care to ensure their show invests in stories with depth and complete characters while allowing jokes to flow from an impulsive place, which feels off-the-cuff.

The performers’ true stories act as five one-person shows that are woven together by virtue of Chicago having an incredibly close knit comedy/performing community. When Jenna Steege, both performer and character, takes steps to let friends in on her grieving process following the loss of her husband, she is met by well meaning, but unhelpful voices not speaking her language of loss. When Kerri Morrison forces herself back into the dating pool (after a heart wrenching song “Room for Somebody New”), she turns to Amber Linde, who is avoiding having to log her sweet and salty indiscretions on an accurate calorie count. They are both the consoling voices at the other end of the same phone call. Performer Lou Leonardo is introduced during his boyhood as a social misfit, and sings an ode to his only solace, Legos, and his obsession to fashion a world in which everything gives that satisfying Lego ‘click’.

These skilled vocalists deliver each song clearly and resolutely, letting us see how well our emotional baggage matches their own. For example, “Piggyback Ride” tracks Amber Linde’s slow resignation to a life of never quite fitting in. The straw that broke my tear ducts came from performer Molly Todd Madison, unpacking objects that take her back to momentous events in her life. Absent from these events is the mother she tries so desperately to reach. The action of being lost in a sense memory, however, is powerful enough to draw in every voice and resonate in every story. Performers chime in with almost impulsive song interjections about their first taste of ice cream cake, or the sound of a loved one’s voice breaking.

Brad Kemp and Jill Valentine have zeroed in beautifully on the real life specifics that allow each song to tap into your experience, no matter if you’re onstage, in the tech booth, in row three or just listening from the lobby. The great insight that “Broken Record” has is allowing each emotional devastation it’s time to act as a skip on the record that brings discord to performers (and equally afflicted audience members). With unexpected strength, the performers replace the needles on their own turn-tables and their tracks can finally move forward. Each of them finds a way to rescue their own lives from pain, pick up the pieces and- as they all belt to the rafters- “Be my own fucking hero.”

Also: Please do not let my incredibly weepy assessment give you the wrong impression, this is also one of the funniest things I’ve seen from Stage 773, ever.  Each troupe member is as comically sharp as they are gifted musically, and they take down food porn, sitcoms and bad dates in ridiculous fashion.

TEN WORD SUMMARY: This musical from hilarious Chicago improvisers packs an emotional wallop.

DICE RATING: d12- “Heckuva Good Show”